David not fazed by a steep learning curve or even steeper country

David not fazed by a steep learning curve or even steeper country

David not fazed by a steep learning curve or even steeper country

The learning curve for Civilbuild’s youngest engineer, 24 year old David Tolmie, has suddenly got a whole lot steeper.

Just like the country he is building a large bridge in near Wollombi. David joined Civilbuild two and a half years ago and graduated from Newcastle University last year.

“I have really been thrown into the deep end on this one but it invaluable experience,” David said.

“It is a big bridge with lots of issues but we are working through them and construction is well under way.

“The other engineers here at Civilbuild have been a big help but it’s my project.”

The Cunneens Bridge on the Paynes Crossing Road is being built for Cessnock City Council and is 61 metres long, 11 metres wide and consists of three spans.

“The bridge is big and high and being built insitu over a steep gully in some fairly difficult terrain,” David said.

“To further complicate the issue this bridge is on the route of the Great Northern Road and there are a lot of heritage items nearby that we have to work around.

“Civil Sydney was called in to drive the bored piers with some of them up to 18 metres in depth.

“Those are some of the deepest that Civil Sydney has had to sink.”

The heritage items include parts of a convict built sandstone wall and the original low level bridge which necessitated the relocation of one pile.

An archeologist was required on site during that work. Pile driving was further complicated because of a buried fi bre optic cable and David had to redesign one abutment to avoid it…

Prior to taking on the Cunneens bridge project David had supervised the construction of four bridges in the Tamworth area at Barraba, Manilla, Woollomin and Piallamore.

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